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Examining co-occurring depression and vaping among Black college students at the intersection of sexual orientation and gender identity: Findings from the 2018-2019 Healthy Minds Study

  • Program: Mental Health
  • Background: There is limited understanding of how sexual orientation and gender identity interact and contribute to the risk of co-occurring depression and vaping among Black college students in the United States (U.S.). The present study responds to the significant public health concern of co-occurring mental health and substance use among college students with multiple marginalized identities. Methods: Data for this study were obtained from the 2018-2019 Healthy Minds Study. An analytic sample of 2,795 Black college students (66% cisgender women) was analyzed using multinomial logistic regression to examine differences in depression only (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 sum score ≥ 10), vaping only (any past 30-day use), and co-occurring depression and vaping at the intersection of sexual orientation (heterosexual, sexual minority) and gender identity (cisgender women, cisgender men). We stratified all analyses by gender identity. Models adjusted for age, current financial stress, and past-month academic stress. Results: The percentage of Black cisgender women reporting depression only, vaping only, and co-occurring depression and vaping was 35.05%, 4.05%, and 5.35%, respectively. Among Black cisgender men, 24.69% reported depression only, 6.93% reported vaping only, and 6.93% reported co-occurring depression and vaping. After adjusting for covariates, compared to Black cisgender heterosexual women, sexual minority women had greater odds of reporting depression only (odds ratio [OR]=1.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.23-2.11), vaping only (OR=1.90; 95% CI=1.13-3.19), and co-occurring depression and vaping (OR=3.72; 95% CI=2.40-5.75) when compared to those who reported no depression and no vaping. The association between sexual orientation and the co-occurrence of depression and vaping was not significant among Black cisgender men. Conclusion: This study quantifies intersectional disparities in depression, vaping, and the co-occurrence of depression and vaping among Black college students. Results suggest Black cisgender sexual minority women may be at heightened risk and should be prioritized in prevention and intervention efforts across U.S. college campuses. Future research is needed to investigate how the type of substances vaped affects the co-occurrence of depression and vaping among Black college students and at the intersection of multiple marginalized identities.
Presenters
JaNiene Peoples
Washington University in St. Louis
PhD Student
  • Linked Session ID: 945113
  • Authors: JaNiene Peoples, MS, CHES1, F. Hunter McGuire, MPH1, Sheretta Butler-Barnes, PhD1, Philip Baiden, PhD2, Hannah Szlyk, LCSW, PhD3, Alexis Duncan, MPH, PhD1
    1Washington University in St. Louis, 2The University of Texas at Arlington, 3Washington University School of Medicine
  • Learning Outcome 1: Describe the importance of intersectionality for mental and behavioral health research among Black LGBTQ+ college students.
  • Learning Outcome 2: Demonstrate the need for quantitative research that examines the co-occurrence of mental health problems and substance use among Black college students.
  • Learning Outcome 3: Identify opportunities for integrated intervention approaches to support specific subgroups of Black LGBTQ+ college students with co-occurring depression and vaping.
  • Linked Session Title: Co-occurance of Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders